Rumi Darwaza

Rumi Darwaza

Rumi (sometimes known as Turkey Gate), in Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, is a grand gateway, built-in 1784 under the patronage of Nawab Asaf-ud-Daula. This is an example of Awadhi architecture – the Rumi Darwaza, which is sixty feet tall, was built in Istanbul after the Sublime Porte (Bab-Ihumayun). It is adjacent to the Asafi Imambara in Lucknow and has become the logo of the city of Lucknow. It marked the entrance to the old Lucknow city, but as the city of the Nawabs grew and expanded, it was later used as the entrance to a palace, which was later demolished by the British rebels. Was.

Etymology

Rumi means Muslim philosopher and scholar Maulana Rumi. It is believed that the gate is called Rumi Gate after the 13th-century Muslim Sufi mystic, Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Zami. In terms of economic policy, Nawab Asaf-ud-Daula was quite Keynesian. Every time there was a famine or a dip in economic activity, the Nawab appointed the poor to build some kind of new building in exchange for food or money. Rumi Darwaza is the result of such a policy.

Place

Rumi means Muslim philosopher and scholar Maulana Rumi. It is believed that the gate is called Rumi Gate after the 13th-century Muslim Sufi mystic, Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Zami. This huge gate is situated between Barra Imambara and Chota Imambara. The place is generally very busy throughout the day, and most tourists visit during weekends. The roads have been redeveloped since it was first constructed of hard brick roadways.